football soccer khaled3ken

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Saturday, January 12, 2013

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery IVAN KAVIEDES

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery IVAN KAVIEDES

Jaime Iv?n Kaviedes Llorenty (born October 24, 1977) is an Ecuadorian footballerwho plays for Sociedad Deportiva Aucas. He is one of the leading players in Ecuadorian football.Kaviedes is known as a striker with wonderful touch, great vision, passing range and a keen eye for goal. Although not particularly strong in the air, Kaviedes has scored spectacular overhead goals in his career. One remembered well even to this day was the bicycle kick he did with his back turned against FC Barcelona while playing forReal Valladolid. This goal was voted as the goal of the year.Kaviedes rose to fame after scoring 43 goals in one season for Emelec in the 1998Ecuadorian league. This led to a move to Perugia in the Italian Serie A. Kaviedes was unsuccessful there, since then he had journeyed around the world playing for a number of clubs in Europe, Mexico, and South America, even returning to his homeland.After a brief spell in Deportivo Quito, Kaviedes signed with FA Premier League clubCrystal Palace, and became the third Ecuadorian to play in the Premier League. He arrived at the club for a fee of reputedly £2,000,000, though there is confusion over whether he was signed on loan or on a full transfer. However, Kaviedes did not fit into Crystal Palace or with Manager Iain Dowie's 4-5-1 formation. He was transferred out of the club in the 2004/05 winter transfer window.After the 2006 FIFA World Cup he transferred from Argentinos Juniors in Argentinafor El Nacional in his homeland, 2006 Ecuadorian League Champions. In his first official game for the club, he scored an impressive four goals. He scored 14 goals in 2007. Ivan has transferred to LDU Quito for the 2008 season. After two games and one goal for the club, Kaviedes had a row with the directors of the Quito club and did not make an appearance for them for the rest of 2008. In 2009, he began to train again with LDU Portoviejo, but never signed with the club. At the end of 2009, Kaviedes was in a rehabilitation clinic for a couple of months. Because of unsportsmanlike conduct, Macara cancelled his contract and Kaviedes was searching for a club in Turkey or Lebanon.In 2010, after almost two years of last playing as a professional, he was signed by Macar? of Ambato. In his third game for the club on February 28 against Universidad Cat?lica, Kaviedes scored his first professional goal in 743 days. By the end of the day, he scored a hat-trick to give Macar? their first win of the season

Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه مشاهير العالم كرة القدم الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery IVAN HURTADO

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery IVAN HURTADO

Iv?n Jacinto Hurtado Angulo (born August 16, 1974 in Esmeraldas) is anEcuadorian professional football centre back for Barcelona as well as captaining theEcuadorian national team. He is currently one of the most capped male footballers of all time.He started his career with the small club of his hometown, Esmeraldas Petrolero, at the age of 16. A year later he moved on to one of Ecuador's biggest clubs inGuayaquil, Emelec, and had two stellar seasons, including two championships with the club, in one of them he scored the championship goal with a free kick he executed.His excellent play warranted a switch to the Mexican leagues where he even further developed his defending techniques and his intelligent read of the game. Ivan made a big impact in his first club, Celaya, where he led them to the Mexican league finals. He then moved to Tigres. He then moved on to the La Liga in Spain playing for Real Murcia.[1] After a mostly successful spell with Pachuca in Primera Divisi?n de México, he moved on to Al Arabi in the Qatari League, impressing many over there.After the FIFA World Cup in Germany, where Hurtado shone, it was reported that high profile clubs such as English Premier League's Wigan Athletic, and Spanish La Liga'sRecreativo Huelva and Villarreal were highly interested in him. However none of these rumors were accurate, and after spending six more months with Al Arabi, Hurtado moved to Colombia where he played for Atlético Nacional, he led the defence of the team, becoming captain in the back-to-back titles in 2007. In mid-2009, he will return to Deportivo Quito for the remainder of their Once a top class defender, he is known in Spanish by his fans as "Bam Bam" for ramming the football with his feet like the Hanna-Barbera character does with his club. Ivan's playing style differs from his national partner, Giovanny Espinoza. While Espinoza is a very large player who uses his size, power and speed to overwhelm his adversary, Hurtado is considered to be very classy and often needs no contact at all to dispossess his adversary. Ivan also makes very clean tackles, organizes his back line as well as the best of them, and can even display confidence with the ball at his feet, and he can occasionally make surprising dashes forward.A notable long and short passer, Hurtado has also taken free kicks well. Although not able to the bend the ball as well as other notable free kick takers, he has been known to strike the ball with such force that goalkeepers find it hard to judge and time his shots.

Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه مشاهير العالم كرة القدم الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery AGUSTIN DELGADA

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery AGUSTIN DELGADA

Agust?n Javier Delgado Chal? (born 23 December 1974 in Ambuqu?, Imbabura) is a retired Ecuadorian footballer. Nicknamed T?n, Delgado is the all-time top scorer for theEcuadorian national team with 31 goals in 71 games. He played professional club football in Ecuador, Mexico and England.
Delgado moved to Southampton in 2001. Unfortunately, Tin – as he is affectionately known to his legion of fans – was dogged by injuries which restricted him to only a few games during his time with the Saints. Southampton tried to get him back to fitness after the injury he picked in Necaxa prior to the 2002 World Cup Qualifiers, but to no avail.
It might have been a different story had the striker refused to play while injured during the2002 World Cup. The pressure on him to play was enormous, as Ecuadorians believed that, with 9 goals during the 2002 World cup qualifying campaign, he was indispensable; and naturally, Delgado dreamed of playing in a FIFA World Cup. All that led to his decision to play despite injury while heavily medicated on painkillers. Upon return to England, it was found that his injury had become chronic, effectively destroying his future in Europe. He also alienated manager Gordon Strachan by refusing to learn English, and Strachan felt the player had been forced on the club and was very high maintenance. When pressed for his plans for the Ecuadorian, Strachan replied "I've got more important things to think about. I've got a yoghurt to finish by today, the expiry date is today. That can be my priority rather than Agustin Delgado.
However, Delgado scored the winning goal for Southampton in a 3–2 home victory over the then Premiership champions Arsenal. He also scored a goal against Liverpool in the League Cup.
After the unhappy spell at Southampton, he was released and returned to Ecuador to play for a Quito based club Aucas, which was topping the Ecuador Serie A with the likes of René Higuita and Gustavo Figueroa leading the way. He played an impressive half season and his return to form led to his joining Mexican club UNAM Pumas, where he helped the team win the league championship.
Delgado was then transferred to Barcelona SC from UNAM Pumas on 1 January 2005 for an undisclosed fee. While at Barcelona de Guayaquil, he teamed up with his preferred Ecuador strike partner Iv?n Kaviedes. With these two formidable strikers leading the attack, the Guayaquil based club were expected to not only win championships, but to dominate the league. This did not happen. Delgado started strongly, but ended the season with only 7 goals. He was subsequently accused by the club president, Isidro Romero Carbo, of not taking the club seriously despite earning top wages. Following reports that Tin was partying late at wild clubs with teammatesEdwin Villafuerte and Walter Ayovi, prompting their exits from the prestigious club.
Delgado then joined Liga Deportiva Universitaria de Quito, a team regularly featuring in the Copa Sudamericana and Copa Libertadores. With his new club, Tin again returned to scoring form and with his goal exploits, he helped Liga surprisingly reach the quarterfinals of the 2006 Copa Libertadores. Delgado was one of eleven players banned for between 2 and 12 months for taking part in a vicious brawl at the end of LDU's 1–1 draw at home to Barcelona on 17 December 2006. Four Barcelona players were injured in the incident on the last day of the season which shocked the country and overshadowed the title won by El Nacional. The Ecuadorian Football Federation(FEF) said on its web site that the incident started with a clash between Delgado and his marker, V?ctor Montoya. Montoya later denied that he had deliberately kicked Delgado's injured knee and received no sanction from the FEF. Delgado later said in the National Congress of Ecuador that he had been persecuted by the FEF.
Delgado was then involved in a scandal at a night club on New Year's Eve[citation needed] and left the country to try to continue his career in Major League Soccer. However, FIFA later blocked this by extending the playing ban internationally. The suspension was subsequently changed at an Extraordinary Congress of the FEF, and Delgado was allowed to resume his playing career after 6 months' suspension.
In 2008, he was part of the squad that won the Copa Libertadores, although he did not play in the final decisive game.
In March 2009, the forward signed for Emelec until December 2009. During the 2010 season, he was a player/administrator at Valle del Chota in his native town. He helped guide the club to promotion from the Segunda Categoria to the Serie B for the 2011 season. In February 2011, he announced his retirement from professional football to focus on administering the club

Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Crazy Khaled3Ken Galleryمجانين كرة القدم


Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com



Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Crazy Khaled3Ken Gallery

مجانين كرة القدم

Football history

Football refers to a number of sports that involve, to varying degrees, kicking a ball with the foot to score a goal. The most popular of these sports worldwide is association football, more commonly known as just "football" or "soccer". Unqualified, the word football applies to whichever form of football is the most popular in the regional context in which the word appears, including association football, as well as American football, Australian rules football, Canadian football, Gaelic football, rugby league, rugby union[1] and other related games. These variations of football are known as football codes.
Various forms of football can be identified in history, often as popular peasant games. Contemporary codes of football can be traced back to the codification of these games at English public schools in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. The influence and power of the British Empire allowed these rules of football to spread, including to areas of British influence outside of the directly controlled Empire,though by the end of the nineteenth century, distinct regional codes were already developing: Gaelic Football, for example, deliberately incorporated the rules of local traditional football games in order to maintain their heritage.In 1888, The Football League was founded in England, becoming the first of many professional football competitions. During the twentieth century, the various codes of football became amongst the most popular team sports in the world.
The various codes of football share the following common elements[citation needed]:
Two teams of usually between 11 and 18 players; some variations that have fewer players (five or more per team) are also popular.
A clearly defined area in which to play the game.
Scoring goals or points, by moving the ball to an opposing team's end of the field and either into a goal area, or over a line.
Goals or points resulting from players putting the ball between two goalposts.
The goal or line being defended by the opposing team.
Players being required to move the ball—depending on the code—by kicking, carrying, or hand-passing the ball.
Players using only their body to move the ball.
In most codes, there are rules restricting the movement of players offside, and players scoring a goal must put the ball either under or over a crossbar between the goalposts. Other features common to several football codes include: points being mostly scored by players carrying the ball across the goal line; and players receiving a free kick after they take a mark or make a fair catch.
Peoples from around the world have played games which involved kicking or carrying a ball, since ancient times. However, most of the modern codes of football have their origins in England.
There are confilicting explanations of the origin of the word "football". It is widely assumed that the word "football" (or "foot ball") references the action of the foot kicking a ball. There is an alternative explanation, which is that football originally referred to a variety of games in medieval Europe, which were played on foot. There is no conclusive evidence for either explanation.
The Ancient Greeks and Romans are known to have played many ball games, some of which involved the use of the feet. The Roman game harpastum is believed to have been adapted from a Greek team game known as (Episkyros)[8][9] or (phaininda),[10] which is mentioned by a Greek playwright, Antiphanes (388–311 BC) and later referred to by the Christian theologian Clement of Alexandria (c.150-c.215 AD). These games appear to have resembled rugby football.[11][12][13][14][15] The Roman politician Cicero (106–43 BC) describes the case of a man who was killed whilst having a shave when a ball was kicked into a barber's shop. Roman ball games already knew the air-filled ball, the follis
Documented evidence of an activity resembling football can be found in the Chinese military manual Zhan Guo Cecompiled between the 3rd century and 1st century BC.[18]It describes a practice known as cuju (??, literally "kick ball"), which originally involved kicking a leather ball through a small hole in a piece of silk cloth which was fixed on bamboo canes and hung about 9 m above ground. During the Han Dynasty(206 BC–220 AD), cuju games were standardized and rules were established.[citation needed]Variations of this game later spread to Japan and Korea, known as kemari and chuk-gukrespectively. Later, another type of goal posts emerged, consisting of just one goal post in the middle of the field.
The Japanese version of cuju is kemari (??), and was developed during the Asuka period.[citation needed]This is known to have been played within the Japanese imperial court in Kyoto from about 600 AD. In kemari several people stand in a circle and kick a ball to each other, trying not to let the ball drop to the ground (much likekeepie uppie). The game appears to have died out sometime before the mid-19th century. It was revived in 1903 and is now played at a number of festivals.[citation needed]
There are a number of references to traditional, ancient, orprehistoric ball games, played by indigenous peoples in many different parts of the world. For example, in 1586, men from a ship commanded by an English explorer named John Davis, went ashore to play a form of football with Inuit (Eskimo) people in Greenland.[19] There are later accounts of an Inuit game played on ice, calledAqsaqtuk. Each match began with two teams facing each other in parallel lines, before attempting to kick the ball through each other team's line and then at a goal. In 1610,William Strachey, a colonist at Jamestown, Virginia recorded a game played by Native Americans, called Pahsaheman.[citation needed] On the Australian continent several tribes ofindigenous people played kicking and catching games with stuffed balls which have been generalised by historians as Marn Grook (Djab Wurrung for "game ball"). The earliest historical account is an anecdote from the 1878 book by Robert Brough-Smyth, The Aborigines of Victoria, in which a man called Richard Thomas is quoted as saying, in about 1841 in Victoria, Australia, that he had witnessed Aboriginal people playing the game: "Mr Thomas describes how the foremost player will drop kick a ball made from the skin of a possum and how other players leap into the air in order to catch it." Some historians have theorised that Marn Grook was one of the origins of Australian rules football.
The M?ori in New Zealand played a game called Ki-o-rahi consisting of teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target.[citation needed]
Games played in Mesoamerica with rubber balls by indigenous peoples are also well-documented as existing since before this time, but these had more similarities to basketballor volleyball, and since their influence on modern football games is minimal, most do not class them as football.[citation needed]Northeastern American Indians, especially the IroquoisConfederation, played a game which made use of net racquets to throw and catch a small ball; however, although a ball-goal foot game, lacrosse (as its modern descendant is called) is likewise not usually classed as a form of "football."[citation needed]
These games and others may well go far back into antiquity. However, the main sources of modern football codes appear to lie in western Europe, especially England.
The Middle Ages saw a huge rise in popularity of annual Shrovetide football matches throughout Europe, particularly in England. An early reference to a ball game played in Britain comes from the 9th century Historia Brittonum, which describes "a party of boys ... playing at ball".[21] References to a ball game played in northern France known as La Soule or Choule, in which the ball was propelled by hands, feet, and sticks,date from the 12th century.
The early forms of football played in England, sometimes referred to as "mob football", would be played between neighbouring towns and villages, involving an unlimited number of players on opposing teams who would clash en masse, struggling to move an item, such as inflated animal's bladder to particular geographical points, such as their opponents' church, with play taking place in the open space between neighbouring parishes. The game was played primarily during significant religious festivals, such as Shrovetide,Christmas, or Easter, and Shrovetide games have survived into the modern era in a number of English towns (see below).
The first detailed description of what was almost certainly football in England was given byWilliam FitzStephen in about 1174–1183. He described the activities of London youths during the annual festival of Shrove Tuesday:
After lunch all the youth of the city go out into the fields to take part in a ball game. The students of each school have their own ball; the workers from each city craft are also carrying their balls. Older citizens, fathers, and wealthy citizens come on horseback to watch their juniors competing, and to relive their own youth vicariously: you can see their inner passions aroused as they watch the action and get caught up in the fun being had by the carefree adolescents.
Most of the very early references to the game speak simply of "ball play" or "playing at ball". This reinforces the idea that the games played at the time did not necessarily involve a ball being kicked.
An early reference to a ball game that was probably football comes from 1280 at Ulgham, Northumberland, England: "Henry... while playing at ball.. ran against David". Football was played in Ireland in 1308, with a documented reference to John McCrocan, a spectator at a "football game" at Newcastle, County Down being charged with accidentally stabbing a player named William Bernard. Another reference to a football game comes in 1321 at Shouldham, Norfolk, England: "[d]uring the game at ball as he kicked the ball, a lay friend of his... ran against him and wounded himself".

In 1314, Nicholas de Farndone, Lord Mayor of the City of London issued a decree banning football in the French used by the English upper classes at the time. A translation reads: "[f]orasmuch as there is great noise in the city caused by hustling over large foot balls [rageries de grosses pelotes de pee in the fields of the public from which many evils might arise which God forbid: we command and forbid on behalf of the king, on pain of imprisonment, such game to be used in the city in the future." This is the earliest reference to football.
In 1363, King Edward III of England issued a proclamation banning "...handball, football, or hockey; coursing and cock-fighting, or other such idle games", showing that "football" — whatever its exact form in this case — was being differentiated from games involving other parts of the body, such as handball.
A game known as "football" was played in Scotland as early as the 15th century: it was prohibited by the Football Act 1424 and although the law fell into disuse it was not repealed until 1906. There is evidence for schoolboys playing a "football" ball game in Aberdeen in 1633 (some references cite 1636) which is notable as an early allusion to what some have considered to be passing the ball. The word "pass" in the most recent translation is derived from "huc percute" (strike it here) and later "repercute pilam" (strike the ball again) in the original Latin. It is not certain that the ball was being struck between members of the same team. The original word translated as "goal" is "metum", literally meaning the "pillar at each end of the circus course" in a Roman chariot race. There is a reference to "get hold of the ball before [another player] does" (Praeripe illi pilam si possis agere) suggesting that handling of the ball was allowed. One sentence states in the original 1930 translation "Throw yourself against him" (Age, objice te illi).
King Henry IV of England also presented one of the earliest documented uses of the English word "football", in 1409, when he issued a proclamation forbidding the levying of money for "foteball".
There is also an account in Latin from the end of the 15th century of football being played atCawston, Nottinghamshire. This is the first description of a "kicking game" and the first description of dribbling: "[t]he game at which they had met for common recreation is called by some the foot-ball game. It is one in which young men, in country sport, propel a huge ball not by throwing it into the air but by striking it and rolling it along the ground, and that not with their hands but with their feet... kicking in opposite directions" The chronicler gives the earliest reference to a football pitch, stating that: "[t]he boundaries have been marked and the game had started.
Other firsts in the medi?val and early modern eras:
"a football", in the sense of a ball rather than a game, was first mentioned in 1486. This reference is in Dame Juliana Berners'Book of St Albans. It states: "a certain rounde instrument to play with ...it is an instrument for the foote and then it is calde in Latyn 'pila pedalis', a fotebal."
a pair of football boots was ordered by King Henry VIII of England in 1526.
women playing a form of football was in 1580, when Sir Philip Sidney described it in one of his poems: "[a] tyme there is for all, my mother often sayes, When she, with skirts tuckt very hy, with girles at football playes."
the first references to goals are in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. In 1584 and 1602 respectively, John Norden and Richard Carew referred to "goals" in Cornish hurling. Carew described how goals were made: "they pitch two bushes in the ground, some eight or ten foote asunder; and directly against them, ten or twelue [twelve] score off, other twayne in like distance, which they terme their Goales". He is also the first to describe goalkeepers and passing of the ball between players.
the first direct reference to scoring a goal is in John Day's play The Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green (performed circa 1600; published 1659): "I'll play a gole at camp-ball" (an extremely violent variety of football, which was popular in East Anglia). Similarly in a poem in 1613, Michael Drayton refers to "when the Ball to throw, And drive it to the Gole, in squadrons forth they goe In the 16th century, the city of Florence celebrated the period between Epiphany and Lent by playing a game which today is known as "calcio storico" ("historic kickball") in the Piazza Santa Croce. The young aristocrats of the city would dress up in fine silk costumes and embroil themselves in a violent form of football. For example, calcio players could punch, shoulder charge, and kick opponents. Blows below the belt were allowed. The game is said to have originated as a military training exercise. In 1580, Count Giovanni de' Bardi di Vernio wrote Discorso sopra 'l giuoco del Calcio Fiorentino. This is sometimes said to be the earliest code of rules for any football game. The game was not played after January 1739 (until it was revived in May 1930).
Numerous attempts have been made to ban football games, particularly the most rowdy and disruptive forms. This was especially the case in England and in other parts of Europe, during the Middle Ages and early modern period. Between 1324 and 1667, football was banned in England alone by more than 30 royal and local laws. The need to repeatedly proclaim such laws demonstrated the difficulty in enforcing bans on popular games. King Edward II was so troubled by the unruliness of football in London that on April 13, 1314 he issued a proclamation banning it: "Forasmuch as there is great noise in the city caused by hustling over large balls from which many evils may arise which God forbid; we command and forbid, on behalf of the King, on pain of imprisonment, such game to be used in the city in the future."
The reasons for the ban by Edward III, on June 12, 1349, were explicit: football and other recreations distracted the populace from practicing archery, which was necessary for war. In 1424, the Parliament of Scotland passed a Football Act that stated it is statut and the king forbiddis that na man play at the fut ball under the payne of iiij d – in other words, playing football was made illegal, and punishable by a fine of four pence.
By 1608, the local authorities in Manchester were complaining that: "With the ffotebale...[there] hath beene greate disorder in our towne of Manchester we are told, and glasse windowes broken yearlye and spoyled by a companie of lewd and disordered persons .. That same year, the word "football" was used disapprovingly by William Shakespeare. Shakespeare's play King Lear contains the line: "Nor tripped neither, you base football player" (Act I, Scene 4). Shakespeare also mentions the game in A Comedy of Errors (Act II, Scene 
While football continued to be played in various forms throughout Britain, its "public" schools (known as private schools in other countries) are widely credited with four key achievements in the creation of modern football codes. First of all, the evidence suggests that they were important in taking football away from its "mob" form and turning it into an organised team sport. Second, many early descriptions of football and references to it were recorded by people who had studied at these schools. Third, it was teachers, students and former students from these schools who first codified football games, to enable matches to be played between schools. Finally, it was at English public schools that the division between "kicking" and "running" (or "carrying") games first became clear.
The earliest evidence that games resembling football were being played at English public schools — mainly attended by boys from the upper, upper-middle and professional classes — comes from the Vulgaria by William Herman in 1519. Herman had been headmaster atEton and Winchester colleges and his Latin textbook includes a translation exercise with the phrase "We wyll playe with a ball full of wynde".
Richard Mulcaster, a student at Eton College in the early 16th century and later headmaster at other English schools, has been described as "the greatest sixteenth Century advocate of football". Among his contributions are the earliest evidence of organised team football. Mulcaster's writings refer to teams ("sides" and "parties"), positions ("standings"), a referee ("judge over the parties") and a coach "(trayning maister)". Mulcaster's "footeball" had evolved from the disordered and violent forms of traditional football:
[s]ome smaller number with such overlooking, sorted into sides and standings, not meeting with their bodies so boisterously to trie their strength: nor shouldring or shuffing one an other so barbarously ... may use footeball for as much good to the body, by the chiefe use of the legges.
In 1633, David Wedderburn, a teacher from Aberdeen, mentioned elements of modern football games in a short Latin textbook calledVocabula. Wedderburn refers to what has been translated into modern English as "keeping goal" and makes an allusion to passing the ball ("strike it here"). There is a reference to "get hold of the ball", suggesting that some handling was allowed. It is clear that the tackles allowed included the charging and holding of opposing players ("drive that man back").[citation needed]
A more detailed description of football is given in Francis Willughby's Book of Games, written in about 1660.Willughby, who had studied at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, Sutton Coldfield, is the first to describe goals and a distinct playing field: "a close that has a gate at either end. The gates are called Goals." His book includes a diagram illustrating a football field. He also mentions tactics ("leaving some of their best players to guard the goal"); scoring ("they that can strike the ball through their opponents' goal first win") and the way teams were selected ("the players being equally divided according to their strength and nimbleness"). He is the first to describe a "law" of football: "they must not strike [an opponent's leg] higher than the ball".[citation needed]
English public schools were the first to codify football games. In particular, they devised the first offside rules, during the late 18th century. In the earliest manifestations of these rules, players were "off their side" if they simply stood between the ball and the goal which was their objective. Players were not allowed to pass the ball forward, either by foot or by hand. They could only dribble with their feet, or advance the ball in a scrum or similar formation. However, offside laws began to diverge and develop differently at each school, as is shown by the rules of football from Winchester, Rugby, Harrow and Cheltenham, during between 1810 and 1850. The first known codes — in the sense of a set of rules — were those of Eton in 1815 and Aldenham in 1825.)
During the early 19th century, most working class people in Britain had to work six days a week, often for over twelve hours a day. They had neither the time nor the inclination to engage in sport for recreation and, at the time, many children were part of the labour force.Feast day football played on the streets was in decline. Public school boys, who enjoyed some freedom from work, became the inventors of organised football games with formal codes of rules.
Football was adopted by a number of public schools as a way of encouraging competitiveness and keeping youths fit. Each school drafted its own rules, which varied widely between different schools and were changed over time with each new intake of pupils. Two schools of thought developed regarding rules. Some schools favoured a game in which the ball could be carried (as at Rugby,Marlborough and Cheltenham), while others preferred a game where kicking and dribbling the ball was promoted (as at Eton, Harrow,Westminster and Charterhouse). The division into these two camps was partly the result of circumstances in which the games were played. For example, Charterhouse and Westminster at the time had restricted playing areas; the boys were confined to playing their ball game within the school cloisters, making it difficult for them to adopt rough and tumble running games
The word "football", when used in reference to a specific game can mean any one of those described above. Because of this, much friendly controversy has occurred over the termfootball, primarily because it is used in different ways in different parts of the English-speaking world. Most often, the word "football" is used to refer to the code of football that is considered dominant within a particular region. So, effectively, what the word "football" means usually depends on where one says it.
Association football is known generally as soccer where other codes of football are dominant, including: the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. American football is always football in the United States. In francophone Quebec, where Canadian football is more popular, the Canadian code is known as football and association football is known as le soccer. Of the 45 national FIFA affiliates in which English is an official or primary language, most currently use Football in their organizations' official names. The FIFA affiliates in Canada and the United States use Soccer in their names.
A few FIFA affiliates have recently "normalized" to using "Football", including:
Australia's association football governing body changed its name in 2007 from using "soccer" to "footbal
New Zealand also changed in 2007, saying "the international game is called football
Samoa changed from "Samoa Football (Soccer) Federation" to "Football Federation Samoa" in 2009


Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery STARS serbia and montenegro mladen krstajic

Mladen Krstaji? (Serbian Cyrillic: born 4 March 1974) is a formerSerbian footballer who played as a center back. He was known for his composure, leadership and defensive ability
Mladen Krstaji? was born in Zenica, SR Bosnia and Herzegovina, SFR Yugoslavia toBosnian Serb mother from Bijeljina and Montenegrin father from ?abljak.
He grew up in Bosnia and Herzegovina and played in the youth squads of NK ?elik Zenica (1984–1992). Because of the Bosnian war he and his family moved to Serbia.
After playing in the youth system of NK ?elik, Krstaji? moved to Kikinda in April 1992, following the breakout of the Bosnian war. He started playing with FK Senta for six months. He then moved on the OFK Kikinda, at that time a first league club. At some point of a successful career as a Serbian football player, there comes the time, to decide, whether one wants to play for Partizan or for Zvezda, and Krstaji? decided to take the move to Partizan in 1996. According to Krstaji? himself, also FK Crvena zvezda was interested in him, but as he comes from a "Partizan" family, he decided to sign a contract with his favourite club. His four and a half years at Partizan was more than successful, winning the national championships three times (1996, 1997, 1999) and also the national cup in 1998.
The defender with the "winner mentality" (Jupp Heynckes) moved then to SV Werder Bremen, where he became one of the best defenders in the Fu?ball-Bundesliga, winning the German Championship and Cup with Werder in 2004. Since 2004 he played for FC Schalke 04, where he was named the new captain on 17 March 2009.On 5 June 2009, Krstaji? signed a two-year contract with his former club FK Partizan. In January 2010, after the departure of Nenad ?or?evi?, he was named a new Partizan captain. After two very successful seasons, he played his last professional match on 21 May 2011. Immediately after retiring he was appointed as the new director of football of the club. After less than 6 months as director of football, he was sacked due to a media war against club president Dragan ?uri?. Aleksandar Stanojevi? resigned as head coach as a result. The day before he was released, Partizan fans Grobari chanted his name as a sign of support during a basketball match against arch rivals KK Crvena Zvezda.
Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery STARS serbia and montenegro dragan stojkovic

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery STARS serbia and montenegro dragan stojkovic

Dragan Stojkovi? (Serbian Cyrillic: born March 3, 1965), also known under the nickname Piksi is a Serbian former footballer. He is manager of J. League side Nagoya Grampus.
Stojkovi? was long time captain of the Yugoslavia national football team and Red Star Belgrade, and is considered one of the best players in the history of Yugoslavian and Serbian football. He is one of the five players to be awarded the title Star of the Red Star. He is widely considered to have never shown his true potential in Europe as injury prevented him from establishing himself at Marseille and at European level despite being considered Red Star's greatest player of a squad that went on to great heights, such as winning the European Cup, with some of their players becoming stars at AC Milan, Juventus and Real Madrid.
Born to father Dobrivoje and mother Desanka in Ni?, SR Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia, Stojkovi? took to football very early while growing up in Pasi Poljana community near Ni?.[citation needed] He has been nicknamed Piksi after Pixie, one of the characters from the cartoon Pixie & Dixie and Mr. Jinks.
A 175 cm, 73 kg midfielder and occasional forward, Stojkovi? began his professional playing career with Yugoslav First League and hometown side Radni?ki Ni? in 1981-82 when he made one first-team appearance. The next four seasons, Stojkovi? appeared in 69 matches for Radni?ki and scored eight goals.
With top Yugoslav teams chasing his signature in the summer of 1986, twenty-one-year-old Stojkovi? moved to Red Star Belgradewhere he would spend the next four illustrious seasons, scoring 54 times in 120 appearances and developing into the best player in the league. He was the Yugoslav League MVP in 1988 and '89 season, and was named the Yugoslav Footballer of the Year both years.
On 3 May 1989 his stellar performances with Red Star earned him the title of Zvezdina zvezda only given out to the very best players in the club's storied history.
In the summer of 1990, twenty-five-year-old Stojkovi? made the much publicized move to Olympique de Marseille for a transfer fee of£5.5 million, joining the star-laden squad bankrolled by French businessman/politician Bernard Tapie. The expectations were sky-high with a team featuring world-class players such as Jean-Pierre Papin, Eric Cantona, Chris Waddle, Carlos Mozer, Manuel Amoros,Didier Deschamps, Jean Tigana, Abédi Pelé, etc. as well as newly arrived midfielder Basile Boli and new head coach Franz Beckenbauer fresh off winning the 1990 FIFA World Cup with Germany. Stojkovi? had his own shining moments at the said World Cup, all of which only contributed to Marseille's interest.
Early into his debut season, Stojkovi? sustained a knee injury for which he had to have surgery in Germany, forcing him to the sidelines for months. In fact, the entire 1990-91 league season was injury riddled for the Serb and he ended up making only eleven league appearances. Beckenbauer stepped down from the coaching post during the winter break although he remained with the club in an adviser capacity. The new head coach to replace the famous German was Raymond Goethals. In the final of the UEFA European Champions' Cup, Marseille played against Stojkovi?'s former team Red Star. Stojkovi?, a penalty kick specialist, entered the game late during the extra-time as a substitute, but as the match eventually went to penalty shootout, he informed head coach Goethals that he doesn't want to take a penalty shot against his former team. Red Star won the European Cup in the shootout.
He would remain Marseille player for the next four seasons with a half-season loan move to Hellas Verona sandwiched in-between his stints in Marseille.
Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery STARS serbia and montenegro dejan stankovic

Portrait Drawing Soccer Football Khaled3Ken Gallery STARS serbia and montenegro dejan stankovic

Dejan Stankovi? (Serbian Cyrillic: Serbian
pronunciation: jan st born 11 September 1978) is a Serbian association football player who plays for Inter Milan. He captained the Serbian national football team until 2011, when he announced his retirement from international football. He is an attacking midfielder who can also play out wide on the wings or track back in a defensive midfield role. "Deki", as he is nicknamed, is best known for his effective, accurate passing, versatility and creativity as well as his ability to score goals from long distance.
On 13 June 2010 Stankovi? became the first player to have represented three different national teams in the FIFA World Cup: FR Yugoslavia, Serbia and Montenegro and Serbia.
Stankovi? grew up in Zemun, a municipality of Belgrade. Both of his parents, Borislav and Dragica, have strong football backgrounds.
Stankovi? began playing football for FK Teleoptik, based in his neighbourhood of Zemun. When spotted by Red Star cadet squad coach Branko Radovi?, however, 14-year-old Dejan transferred to Red Star Belgrade's youth system.
Stankovi? then passed every age category at his hometown club. In the youth teams, he was coached by Vladimir Petrovi?, playing alongside future professionals Nikola Lazeti? and Nenad Lalatovi?.
During the 1994–95 season, Stankovi?'s debut opportunity for first team action came under head coach Ljupko Petrovi? against crosstown rivals OFK Beograd on 11 February 1995. Fighting for a spot on the team led by, among others, Rambo Petkovi?, Darko Kova?evi?, and Neboj?a Krupnikovi?, 16-year-old Dejan made seven league appearances that season as the team won league title. He scored his first goal against Budu?nost Podgorica, soon becoming a first team regular and a fan favourite.
During the early '90s, Red Star was under an international ban because of a UN sanction imposed on FR Yugoslavia, meaning that the team could not compete in any European competition. The ban was lifted ahead of the 1996–97 season, and Stankovi? played a huge part in a memorable two-leg victory over Kaiserslautern in the Cup Winners' Cup.
Before the start of the 1997–98 season, he was made squad captain at the age of 19, the youngest ever in the club's history. Despite not winning the league he captained the team to two domestic cup victories.
Portrait Drawing Football Star Soccer Player
تعليم رسم البورتريه الرسام خالد عبد الكريم
Egypt / Alexandria
Gallery Khaled3Ken
Artist Khaled abd El-Karin
Artist Ken Maadi/Bernd Hossmann
Language - English and German
Mobile. 00201285107402
Language - Arabic
Mobile.00201226594244
Email:khaled3ken@yahoo.com